Truck driving schools information by state

CDL Truck Driving Schools in Alabama 13 schools
Do you drive a truck with a crimson red paint scheme? If so, look no further than Alabama to begin or enter a new phase of your driving career! And if you like your Saturdays off, you are unlikely to find a state where your supervisors might accommodate you. After all, come autumn, every Saturday through the NCAA National Championship is an unofficial state holiday with college football consuming the state. If Alabama seems like the place for you, Click here for more details on the state's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Alaska 2 schools
If your idea of an exciting truck driving career is based on what you've seen on The History Channel's "Ice Road Truckers," Alaska is about your only option — at least in the U.S. But if you value your life more than 15 minutes of fame as a reality TV star, it doesn't mean Alaska doesn’t offer more "traditional" trucking driving opportunities. And you can't beat the scenery! Click here to learn more about Alaska's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Arizona 14 schools
When it comes to Arizona, it's easy to understand the saying, "It's not that the mountains are so high; it's that the valleys are so deep!" For a state associated with clean desert air and cactus, you might be surprised at what "The Grand Canyon State" offers truck drivers (and a 2% grade highway to the bottom of the Grand Canyon isn't among them). While Arizona is best known for its desert, you can find work hauling timber from the forest areas in northern part of the state! Click here to learn more about Arizona's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Arkansas 7 schools
If you want to shift gears, Arkansas may just be the state to find a truck driver job! And if you're a driver who likes to play, "The Natural State" has more to offer than you likely imagined. You may do a little pre-dawn fishing before picking up a load of farm-raised catfish to haul northwest, or a sunset hike in the Boston Mountains after dropping off your load. Then be sure to pick up a pair of shock absorbers — among Arkansas' leading exports. Click here for more information about Arkansas' trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in California 53 schools
No other western state has a greater impact on the U.S. economy than California and, likewise, you won’t find more quantity or variety of truck driving jobs anywhere else. From products produced in China and Japan arriving at one of its major deep water ports, produce grown in southern California, and the wine produced in its famous vineyards, California offers a little bit of everything. Click here to read more about California's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Colorado 9 schools
Do you get a non-drug induced "high" from driving through some of America's best scenery? If so, you'll get a full dose pursuing your truck driving job in Colorado. And when you're up for a thrill, go ahead and try your luck crossing from east to west. During any season, you might find a snowstorm, but it's the safest thing next to "Ice Road Truckers." And the freight type? Colorado exports a little bit of everything and a lot of nothing. Click here to read more about Colorado's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Connecticut 5 schools
Although Connecticut has a several ports, they don't rival two of the largest in the nation a little over 200 miles apart. As a truck driver in Connecticut, you will spend a lot of time running between Boston and New York City. But if you are not a fan of either the Yankees or Red Sox or their home cities, you'll find in-state carriers that will allow you to drive highways where the poison isn't as strong as bordering states. Click here to read more about Connecticut’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Delaware 4 schools
When Washington crossed the Delaware, he was headed for New Jersey. But it you want a truck driving job that will take you across the country to Washington, Delaware is a great place to start. Click here to read more about Delaware’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in District of Columbia 0 school
District of Columbia
Most people don't think of the trucking industry when they talk about Washington D.C., unless it's a slow convoy around the beltway or lining up trucks for protests near the capitol building or the White House. But if you do give it some thought, every time the House, Senate, or Presidency shifts one way or the other, those convoys exit the beltway and head into the heart of government with all types of goods and materials. So, Click here to learn more about Washington D.C.'s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Florida 33 schools
If you hold Walt Disney close to your heart, or if the thought of beaches less than two hours in any direction gets your blood pumping, then look at Florida for your next truck driver job. If you're lucky, you may even land a dedicated truck driving job serving Disney, Universal, or another theme park that draw tourists from around the world. But if your idea of a quick lunch is not fried theme park food, Florida won't disappoint. "The Sunshine State" has plenty to offer in terms of work and play! Click here to learn more about Florida's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Georgia 34 schools
Has anyone ever told you that you're one "peach" of a driver? We didn't think so. But spend a career hauling loads of Georgia peaches to grocery chains throughout the country, and you'll be smelling them the rest of your life! And if big cities are your thing, don't miss Atlanta. The city's "Spaghetti Junction" is among the most noted (and ridiculed) interstate convergence zones in the country! So are you "peachy" enough to find a truck driver job in Georgia? Click here to learn more about Georgia’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Hawaii 1 school
How can a group of five islands 2,500 miles west of the California offer many opportunities for truck drivers? Well, those seven islands can only produce so many of the needs of modern-day America. While the Port of Honolulu is the primary port among them, each island has its own port where it imports every product imaginable for use or consumption, largely for the tourists. And it not likely you will find too many resorts owners interested in meeting ships at the dock with hand carts. Click here to see more about Hawaii’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Idaho 5 schools
If you’re a truck driver looking for a truck driving career hauling potatoes, Idaho is the state you should consider in your job search. After all, the state’s potato producers harvest up to 10 billion spuds annually — that’s 30 potatoes for every American or over 5,700 per Idahoan! But there’s far more to Idaho and the opportunities the state offers its truck drivers than just starch! Click here to learn more about Idaho’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Illinois 53 schools
If Chicago is your "kind of town", you'll find plenty of carriers serving smaller cities and rural areas in "The Land of Lincoln." Illinois offers a lot of opportunities as Chicago borders the Great Lakes, and is a major freshwater port serving the Central U.S. In terms of exports, Illinois ranks as the sixth busiest state in the U.S., even without direct access to a seaport. Just take care driving across those Chicago overpasses. If the wind catches your rig just right, you may wind up in Kansas! Click here to learn more about Illinois’ trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Indiana 14 schools
Indiana has one of the most active trucking industries in the U.S., and it has nothing to do with the 230 mph speeds achieved by the cars that rely on truck transporters to haul them to the Indianapolis 500. "The Hoosier State" is a major thoroughfare for transportation to the Mid-Atlantic and urban Northeast, Chicago and Detroit, and St. Louis and points west and south. Just remember, an Indiana CDL isn't going to give you permission to break the speed limit by 160 mph! Click here for more information about Indiana’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Iowa 8 schools
You can't get much closer to America's heartland than Iowa. And if we live in a land of milk and honey, both are always better with a bowl of corn flakes or Wheaties, the raw ingredients grown in Iowa. But if hauling ag commodities to processing plants isn't your idea of a satisfying career, don't cross Iowa off your list. Iowa’s economy is far more diverse. Regardless, be thankful for the Iowa's agriculture industry — you'll need to eat lots of Wheaties to keep up with the competition! Click here for more information about Iowa’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Kansas 14 schools
If you are not a Kansas native, chances are your introduction to the state came through "The Wizard of Oz". And if you were like most kids, Kansas was the last place you wanted to live or even visit. Well, it's time to grow up! Kansas may still be prone to storms and tornados, but if your rig is hijacked by wicked witches or flying monkeys, you can bet "you're not in Kansas anymore". There are no yellow brick roads leading to your destination, or offloading in an Emerald City, but Kansas offers plenty of truck driver jobs, so Click here to learn more about Kansas' trucking industry!
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Kentucky 14 schools
Indeed, horses are all the talk in Kentucky, but trucking isn't far behind. Few can plan on a truck driver job hauling racehorses, but there is plenty more to Kentucky's trucking industry. While some truck driving jobs are agriculture-related, if you’re driving out of state, you’re unlikely to be hauling harvested crops or livestock — unless, that is, you consider whiskey an agricultural product. Click here to learn more about Kentucky’s trucking industry!
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Louisiana 10 schools
When you think about Louisiana, chances are your mind turns to New Orleans, Cajun Food, Mardi Gras, and dark swamps and bayous. All are part of Louisiana's unique French-influenced culture, but today truck drivers in the Cajun State don't have to worry about becoming bogged down in swamps. Louisiana is home to one of the nation’s most important ports, New Orleans at the mouth of the Mississippi River and the Gulf of Mexico. Click here for more information on Louisiana's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Maine 8 schools
If you want to avoid heavy traffic, you're best to consider Maine for your truck driving career. While the immense log drives to the coastal cities no longer fuel the shipbuilding economy, if you are a driver in Maine, chances are you'll still be hauling timber. And take pride! Any Mainer will tell you a truck driver can serve no more noble a cause than delivering Maine's largest export, fresh lobster, to those "inland folk." So dig in your claws and Click here to see more about Maine’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Maryland 23 schools
If you're interested in a truck driving career in Maryland, your research should begin with one city — Baltimore. For such a small state, Maryland is home to a tremendous number of truck carriers offering drivers jobs in the less-than-truckload sector. The Port of Baltimore is located near the top of Chesapeake Bay, protected from the Atlantic Ocean by an entire state, Delaware. And take solace in the fact you may see that "Star Spangled Banner" waving over the Port every day! Click here to learn more about Maryland's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Massachusetts 6 schools
As far as Massachusetts is concerned, if you drive in-state, plan on a lot of time in Boston. The port may not be known for its 18th century tea parties, but working out of the western hemisphere's oldest continually operating seaport isn't anything to scoff at! Try wearing a Yankees cap and increase your chances of getting tarred and feathered next to the U.S.S. Constitution! Click here for more details about the Massachusetts' trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Michigan 23 schools
If you know nothing else about Michigan, you know it's all about the automotive industry. Nine of The Great Lakes State’s top ten exports are vehicles or vehicle parts. And who knew that rear-view mirrors counted as an export unto its own? For truckers, the best thing about four-wheeled vehicles is that most everyone has or needs one, and it's a whole lot more efficient to haul a truckload of them to a dealership than to drive each separately. Click here to learn more about Michigan’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Minnesota 11 schools
Now how can a truck driver expect to find a route through the "Land of 10,000 Lakes"? Well, roads they have, and they provide service to a lot of natural resources. So if all these natural resources can be fit between 10,000 "prairie potholes" often filled with ducks, Minnesota folks now doubt have found ways to reach what they need. Don't get concerned if you happen to find your rig in a prairie pothole, as those ducks will take good care of it until they leave for the winter. Click here to read more about Minnesota’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Mississippi 11 schools
Roll on Mississippi! When the demand for cotton dropped, the bottom of Mississippi's economy did as well. But what better answer to a lousy economy than a whole lotta casinos? But don't bet your money on the casinos making you a rich truck driver. A major part of truck driving is from the neighboring state and its port city of New Orleans. Today, Mississippi’s economy is largely driven by oil production, although cotton is still hanging in at number three. Click here to learn more about Mississippi’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Missouri 17 schools
"Show Me!" That's what you'll hear in Missouri, but it doesn't necessarily mean no one trusts anybody. Chances are Missourians just want to see what you are hauling and decide if they want a load of it as well. When you reach the urban areas and encounter those four-wheelers flying like they're headed for air space, take a cue from Mark Twain and remind yourself, "No amount of evidence will ever persuade an idiot." Click here for more about Missouri’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Montana 5 schools
Consider placing Montana on your truck driving home base wishlist, as wide-open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. And if you're worried about finding a job, there is high demand for truck drivers while unemployment numbers are the lowest in the U.S. But if all that wide-open space gives you an itch to move, you'll find interstates with the highest speed limits in the country. Click here to learn more about the trucking industry in Montana, where the pace of life is far slower than speed limits.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Nebraska 6 schools
If you like driving with limited traffic, a truck driving job in Nebraska is a good option for you. Wide open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. You might haul everything from cattle to minerals to wind turbines. But if all that wide-open space gives you an itch to move, you'll find interstates with the highest speed limits in the country. Click here to learn more the trucking industry in Nebraska, where the pace of life is far slower than speed limits and wind speeds.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Nevada 5 schools
There is money to be made in the Nevada trucking industry, and it doesn't mean you need to pull into Vegas and double-down with your rig as collateral! Nevada is growing, and a lot of the growth is probably from tourists who can't find bus fare home after a night on the town! The state's top three exports relate directly to the gambling industry — gold, slot machine-type devices, and the circuits that help keep slot machines honest! Imagine the prestige you'll feel hauling a load of gold to... well to wherever gold is hauled! Click here to learn more about Nevada's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in New Hampshire 3 schools
If you want to avoid heavy traffic, one of your best options is New Hampshire. Other than being an upside down version of Vermont with the extra convenience of a seaport, truck drivers in New Hampshire will likely find themselves spending a lot of time in Boston. But if "Beantown" isn't your idea of a good time, you can always head over to Maine instead and offload at Portland. And being from New Hampshire though, Mainers will point out your head is filled with granite. Click here to learn more about New Hampshire's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in New Jersey 21 schools
Many consider New Jersey and over-urbanized extension of its northern neighbor, New York. Considering that both the New York Giants and New York Jets call New Jersey home, the line between the two states certainly blurs. But the similarities aren't quite as evident when you compare the primary exports of each state. Regardless, if you are a driver based in New Jersey expect a lot of out-of-state driving and a lot of time spent in traffic bound for New York. Click here to learn more about New Jersey's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in New Mexico 2 schools
The romance of Route 66 helped make travel through New Mexico a cultural phenomenon only equaled by the state's major import — ALIENS near Roswell. But a trucker, you might transport a much needed commodity — WATER! Imagine driving through the desert knowing you have a trailer-load of water behind you. You may be tempted to open the hatch and take a quick dip. But remember, "NO SWIMMING ALLOWED!" If the idea of living in "The Land of Enchantment" intrigues you, Click here for details on New Mexico's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in New York 20 schools
If you are looking for a state where you can load your trailers in the nation's largest port and transport it to parts unknown, New York is for you! As a New York-based driver, you have opportunities to transport internationally, and we don't just mean crossing the border into Canada. Products imported and exported from the Port of New York arrive from or are destined for most any country in the world. And don't worry about your 20 million other fellow state residents, you can only have so many neighbors! Click here for more information about New York's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in North Carolina 32 schools
When it comes to North Carolina, the top products generated include sweet potatoes, textiles, and tobacco (well, maybe not so much tobacco as a few decades back). And don't forget they have more Christmas Trees than New York City can afford to light up! All of these products are primarily hauled by truck. And if that's not enough, you'll find ports along the coastlines where trucks seemingly off-load and take on freight non-stop. Click here to learn more about North Carolina's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in North Dakota 5 schools
If you like driving with limited traffic, a truck driving job in North Dakota is likely waiting for you. Wide open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. You might haul everything from cattle to minerals to wind turbines. But if all that wide-open space gives you an itch to move, you'll find interstates with the highest speed limits in the country. Click here to learn more the trucking industry in North Dakota, where the pace of life is far slower than speed limits and wind speeds.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Ohio 23 schools
Like its neighbor Indiana, Ohio is as close as one can get to the ideal state to operate as a truck driver. Ohio offers inland ports along Lake Erie, most notably Cleveland, and has easy access to the east coast and its large ports. In addition, Ohio has easy access to all points west and south making it a trucker-friendly state whether you care about hauling buckeyes or not. For a truck driver the best thing about Ohio's exports is that they are all big and need big rigs to carry them to their destinations. Click here for details on Ohio's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Oklahoma 12 schools
You've been sitting behind the wheel for a few weeks, and you've seen the country. What you're looking for now is a lot of space to spread out and relax. If this sounds like you, Oklahoma may be the perfect place for you! And if you're worried about finding a job, there is high demand for truck drivers in Oklahoma. Open up the throttle and get some diesel pumping through you truck's veins (all while adhering to appropriate safe driving methods, of course). Click here to learn more about Oklahoma's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Oregon 9 schools
Looking for variety? Then consider what Oregon has to offer in terms of geography alone: volcanoes, abundant bodies of water, dense evergreen and mixed forests, high deserts, and semi-arid shrublands. The Columbia and Snake Rivers are navigable and provide a seagoing port to Idaho, which gives Oregon a seaport 375 miles from the nearest sea. It's true that there aren't many states where you need to worry about a volcanic ash storm, but if you've lived through one like Mt. Saint Helens, the worst should be over. Click here to learn more about Oregon's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Pennsylvania 45 schools
After 250 years, Pennsylvania remains a testament to liberty, provided you are able to put high-priced toll roads out of you mind. If you and your truck are built of steel, you've come to the right place as steel is always in demand and it takes a lot of trucks to keep the nation supplied. Not far west of Philly you'll find Amish Country, where they are happy to see 18-wheelers pulling to the doors of companies selling some of the best hand-made furniture in the world. But drive safely because more than one big rig has been run off the road by a one-horse carriage. Click here to learn more about Pennsylvania's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Rhode Island 3 schools
If you are looking to drive in the far northeastern U.S, like crowds and easy access to the Big Apple, Rhode Island is likely a good state for your next truck driving job. You'll find a seaport or two, and being midway between Boston and New York keeps the traffic down. And while you might have hauled a lot of whale oil out of the state in the 19th century, today you'll likely carry primary export — scrap metal — most likely the remains of vehicles totaled along the highways in Massachusetts and Connecticut! Click here to read more about Rhode Island's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in South Carolina 19 schools
When it comes to South Carolina, the top products generated include sweet potatoes, textiles, and tobacco (well, maybe not so much tobacco as a few decades back). And don't forget they have more Christmas Trees than New York City can afford to light up! All of these products are primarily hauled by truck. And if that's not enough, you'll find ports along the coastlines where trucks seemingly off-load and take on freight non-stop. Click here to learn more about South Carolina's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in South Dakota 7 schools
If you like driving with limited traffic, a truck driving job in South Dakota is likely waiting for you. Wide-open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. You might haul everything from cattle to minerals to wind turbines. But if all that wide open space gives you an itch to move, you'll find interstates with the highest speed limits in the country. Click here to learn more the trucking industry in South Dakota, where the pace of life is far slower than speed limits and wind speeds.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Tennessee 21 schools
If truck drivers in Tennessee aren't affiliated with Memphis-based Federal Express, chances are they are bound for any of the numerous interstate junctions heading to any other part of the US. When you transport Tennessee-produced products out-of-state, you'll may be serving the highest calling of any occupation — saving lives. Medical instruments and artificial joints are all among the top exports. While this may tempt you to become a "Tennessee Volunteer," don't worry, you will be paid for the haul! Click here to see read more about Tennessee's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Texas 53 schools
When you hear "Texas", need we say more? Texans don't think so. "It's like a whole other country" pretty much sums it up. You could spend a lifetime trucking within the borders of Texas and never see it all. And with three of the most populous cities in the U.S., all unique to themselves, demand for variety when it comes to freight shipped by truck is unending. As the saying goes, "Everything is big in Texas," so head on down and slap a "Native Texan" sticker on the side of your rig. It'll be like meeting a whole new family! Click here to find out more about Texas' trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Utah 12 schools
If you like driving with beautiful scenery and limited traffic, a truck driving job in Utah may be on your wish list. Wide open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. And if you're worried about finding a job, there is high demand for truck drivers with the lowest unemployment numbers in the U.S. You might haul everything from cattle to minerals to wind turbines. You may try to hook onto a trailer full of wind energy and see if you can reach your destination before it spoils! Click here to learn more about Utah's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Vermont 3 schools
Vermont has a rich history in the transportation industry most of it buried at the bottom of Lake Champlain. Vermont roadways wind through small scenic villages, and some don't allow truck traffic out of spite. With the 52nd largest economy in the U.S. (trailing the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico) it would seem Vermont doesn't have much to offer a truck driver, but if you want a regional route, you can find opportunities with small carriers that allows a lot of home time in a state where insect species outnumber the capital city's population 2:1. Click here to read more about Vermont's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Virginia 16 schools
When it comes to early American history, it's hard to get much earlier than Virginia. But you probably aren't planning to haul your load with a team of oxen, so those days aren't so important in the 21st century. What is important is that Virginia is home to several ports, the largest at Norfolk, also among the world's largest naval bases. You might in fact find a job with a military contractor and help stock Navy ships with enough food and supplies to last months at sea. Click here to learn more about Virginia’s trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Washington 11 schools
If Washington intrigues you as a place to pursue your trucking career, prepare to be confused. After all, how could a state on the opposite side of the country from where George Washington spent his entire life take his name as its own? Just think, if West Virginia had chosen to be Washington, it would have its own identity and make geographic sense! But given that cherries and timber (i.e. trees) are among its many exports, now you know why the state took Washington's name. Click here to learn more about Washington's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in West Virginia 8 schools
While "The Mountain State" does rely on the coal industry for jobs, ranks second to Wyoming in coal production, and has exports of coal that make up 38% of what its mines produce. In fact, the majority of West Virginia coal remains in-state and produces electricity, plastics and rubber. So, if you happen to land a trucking job in West Virginia, you'll always have the comfort of knowing that where there is rubber, there are tires. Click here to learn more about West Virginia's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Wisconsin 18 schools
If you're lactose intolerant but looking to drive a truck in Wisconsin, do not fear. Common to popular belief, dairy products are not a major export from "The Badger State." In fact, not even one of top 10 exports is tied to agriculture. You're far more likely to find yourself hauling a load of aircraft parts, outboard engines, medical supplies, or silica sand than a jug of milk or a slab of cheese. And if you like the snow and cold and prefer not to travel south, Wisconsin is the place for you since nearly a third of all Wisconsin exports are headed to Canada. Click here to learn more about Wisconsin's trucking industry.
CDL Truck Driving Schools in Wyoming 3 schools
If you like driving with beautiful scenery and limited traffic, a truck driving job in Wyoming may be on your wish list. Wide open spaces abound with low population densities and lots of ranchland. And if you're worried about finding a job, there is high demand for truck drivers with the lowest unemployment numbers in the U.S. You might haul cattle, minerals or even coal since Wyoming leads the U.S. in coal production. You may try to hook onto a trailer full of wind energy and see if you can reach your destination before it spoils! Click here to learn more about Wyoming's trucking industry.

School search faqs

A company sponsored CDL training is offered by a carrier where the student attends a school that the carrier operates. The advantages are that these trucking schools are typically waive tuition or have minimal costs. However, once the student graduates, there will be a contractual obligation to drive for that carrier typically for a period of time and/or a certain number of miles – typically at least a year and 100,000 miles. While this means the security of likely immediate employment, it also means no choice in employer.

A College or Trade School truck driving school offers a much lower cost CDL training program typically as they are often publically funded. The National Association of Publicly Funded Truck Driving Schools (NAPFTDS) is an organization for the promotion of public education for the trucking industry. Through membership, educators can network with other publicly funded truck driving schools across the country to provide the highest quality, most cost-effective, and up-to-date training available.

Unlike a company sponsored or College/Trade school, an independent or private school offers the same training but will tend to be more expensive however those costs may be reduced with loans or other financial assistance. These schools are for profit schools. There are more private truck driving schools so this may be more advantageous for most students since they can remain in their immediate area while getting their CDL training especially if they are currently employed.

There are often several options. When looking for different options to become a truck driver, listen to the seasoned truck drivers. Whether you have your CDL (Commercial Driver’s License) or are just starting, the proper training will ultimately be the smartest way to go. This is not something you can learn by watching a few videos! Invest some time in talking to truck driving instructors and program organizers to get a feel for what kind of classroom and on-road experience is offered. Take a look at the curriculum, class-size, and career placement options are available to students after they graduate. Also look at how quickly graduates get hired as a truck driver after completing the course. Ensure that you get the advantage of a solid and useful training experience so your truck driving career will be successful.

On average, it takes about two months to get your CDL (commercial driver’s license) when attending a full-time driver training program at an accredited school. The length of time it takes to get your CDL can take as little as three weeks or close to six months. If you are going for any endorsements or certifications, that will take longer. Another obvious factor is whether the truck driving program is full time or part time. You’ll also want to master driving skills behind the wheel of a big rig so you’ll want to find a school that offers ample time behind the wheel. And finally, everyone learns at a slightly different rate and there is a lot to learn.

Yes, several carriers and large trucking companies have their own truck driving schools. Some carriers will even cover the cost of your truck driving school. There are even some carriers that will offer to compensate you during your training. There are pros and cons as you may be committed to a contract with a particular trucking company. You’ll need to assess what works best for your particular situation in getting your CDL (Commercial Drivers License).

Longer CDL license programs may be problematic if you’re not getting the practical experience within a reasonable amount of time, you may forget some skills. Short programs may not necessarily cover all the skills in enough detail. Some schools may offer different length programs. The location and frequency of the truck driving school.

This is an important question depending on whether you plan on working in a heavily populated area or an area that’s sparsely populated. Ideally try to train for your CDL License near your home unless the area doesn’t necessarily reflect where you’d end up working. Most trucking students find the most success with finding a truck driving school near them.

Some truck schools train in a manner in which a large company would gladly hire a new trucker. The process will be less individualistic and focused more on supporting a larger fleet of trucks. Some driving schools will train in the same format as a smaller company would, with a greater focus on one’s personal driving style and lifestyle. While both approaches ultimately get a driving student to understand the basic skills required in a truck driving job, it’s most advantageous for a new truck driver to be open for employment at any company. As part of your search look at an outline for a class(es) when available. Investigate the topics and skills that are going to be covered and whether or not the program offers a more middle of the road approach that could lead to opportunities at either big, medium or small companies. If available, look to see how many drivers have been placed, and where they ended up working.

Costs for trucking school may vary from $3,000 to $10,000. Higher costs don’t necessarily equate to better. If you find that you like a particular school, but they cost more – don’t be afraid to ask why they cost more. Likewise, if you like a company that seems to be very low, ask them why they are so much lower. And remember some carriers will cover some or all of the costs of training. But remember, there is no free ride, so thoroughly consider pros and cons first, with cost being second on the list.

When attending a private CDL training program you may be eligible for certain types of grants or loans. Given the current shortage of truck drivers, we anticipate these programs will grow. The programs include: Pell Grants which are available to students with limited resources and do not need to be repaid. Military and Veteran Financial Assistance are available to former military personnel and in some cases also don’t need to be repaid. Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act which has funding available for job retraining of some workers. There are often scholarships available for veterans, first responders, low-income workers, and other groups. Most trucking schools can help with this process.

As of July 2021, there is a waiver available from the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) -- Military Skills Test Waiver Program. The program allows drivers who have two years experience safely operating heavy military vehicles to obtain a commercial drivers license (CDL) without having to take the driving test. While CDL licensing varies from state to state, this program is available in all states. Military personnel can use the skills test waiver provided they are currently licensed and are or were employed within the12 months in a military position requiring the operation of a military motor vehicle equivalent to that of a commercial motor vehicle.

There are two professional truck driving school certification organizations that reflect the interests of the trucking industry. These organizations represent the owners, and the entire transportation industry including drivers. Both organizations provide certification for truck driving training programs across the board. However, the federal government will be overseeing the certification of trucking schools effective February 7, 2022.

The Professional Truck Driver Institute (PTDI), a non-profit organization founded in 1986 makes safety and high professional working standards a priority in the industry.Phone: 703-647-7015 https://www.ptdi.org/

The Commercial Vehicle Training Association (CVTA) promotes high standards in training, safety in the industry and driver professionalism. The Commercial Vehicle Training Association (CVTA) is the largest association of commercial truck driving schools. Working with Carrier and Associate members on critical industry issues, CVTA is promoting highway safety through quality training. CVTA Phone: 703-642-9444 https://cvta.org/

The National Association of Publicly Funded Truck Driving Schools (NAPFTDS) is an organization for the promotion of public education for the trucking and transportation industry. Through membership, educators can network with other truck driving schools across the country to provide the highest quality, most cost-effective, and up-to-date training available. NAPFTDS Phone: (316) 425-3297 https://napftds.org/

You will learn how to be a safe over the road (OTR) driver. There will be ample time spent behind the wheel, learning to drive and maneuver the big rig. You’ll also perform maintenance and safety checks ensuring you can get to your destination. A good school will teach you how to maneuver in real world conditions. You will be prepared to take and pass a commercial driver’s license (CDL) test. Once you graduate, a good school will assist you in your search for a job as a professional truck driver.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) is set to implement the Entry-Level Truck Driver Training (ELDT) rule effective February 7, 2022. That regulation, for the first time, will set high standards that all U.S. Commercial Driver’s License (CDL) programs will have to meet. The ELDT rule requires all training providers to register and affirm that they meet the stringent standards outlined in ELDT. More information can be found on the FMCSA website at: https://tpr.fmcsa.dot.gov/

Beginning February 7, 2022, drivers applying to obtain a Class A or Class B CDL for the first time will be subject to the requirements in the Entry-Level Driver Training (ELDT) regulations. These regulations establish a federal standard for training. CDL applicants must successfully complete this training before they will be permitted to take the CDL skills test. Drivers will search for a training provider using the upcoming Training Provider Registry. For more information, visit https://tpr.fmcsa.dot.gov

With so many states having altered guidelines and changed deadlines, it’s best to refer to your state’s Department of Transportation to get the specifics as to what may have changed recently. Here’s a directory by state: https://www.dot.ny.gov/main/alpha-list-state-dots Getting a CDL license and truck driving regulations continue to evolve.

2020 and 2021 have been years unlike any across all industries, and trucking is no different. This is a case where the data is still catching up with the realities. Depending on the state and type of job, compensation can vary from $31,000 per year to over $100,000 per year. Source: https://www.bls.gov/oes/current/oes533032.htm Annual earnings are based on many factors including they type of driving performed and the cargo being hauled. Depending on your compensation arrangement, you may also earn overtime pay and bonuses. Keep in mind that driving a truck is not just a job, it is a lifestyle. Top earning drivers spend much of the year on the road, and this can be hard on families and relationships. Consider if the truck driver’s lifestyle is one that fits what you want in terms of a “work-life balance.”

Different carriers or companies operating trucks use different methods of calculating wages. The basis by which you will be paid is known as a “Pay Structure.” Various structures exist, including payment based on hours worked, miles driven, specific routes driven, or a combination of the three. Typically, full-time truck drivers do not earn a straight annual salary. This is especially the case with OTR drivers.

Per Hour: Hourly compensation is uncommon in the trucking industry. For those company that do pay hourly wages, as of 2019, the average wage is $24.00 per hour. Most often hourly wages apply to local drivers. An advantage of hourly pay is that, provided you work your assigned weekly hours, you can count on a steady income that you can plan for. Hourly drivers are also eligible for overtime, something not provided to most types of drivers. Under this sort of arrangement, you are likely to be home most nights. On the negative side of hourly pay structures, you won’t be paid for “sleeper time,” “layover time,” or “inconvenience time” as are OTR drivers.

Per Mile: Most truck drivers are paid on the basis of miles driven. The mileage and total payment may vary week-to-week, but drivers paid by the mile will find when comparing their wages to other pay structures, they typically earn more per hour or if their pay is salary based. A driver paid per mile normally drives up to 3,000 miles a week, the estimated maximum based on the “Hours of Service” regulations. When converting to an hourly wage, mileage-based pay may equal up to $50.00 per hour. According the to the U.S. Department of Labor, most mileage-based drivers earn 28-40 cents per mile driven. Some companies will pay slightly more for drivers with extensive experience or who specialize in hauling a dangerous, high-value, or otherwise out-of-the-ordinary types of freight. In terms of disadvantages, any inconvenience (weather, breakdown, urban driving) that decreases the number of miles driven during a given period will have a negative impact on your paycheck.

Route-based: Like hourly pay structures, few companies pay on a route-basis. In most cases, a truck driver with a normal delivery route is more likely to be paid an hourly wage or salary than a lump sum dependent on a delivery route. Routes are usually fairly short, meaning overnight driving is not always required. On the other hand, if paid a specific amount to complete a given route, drivers who experience delays during the day may find themselves working long hours (but in no case more than the FMCSA regulations allow). Route-based drivers should study the FMCSA regulations that provide exceptions to the Hours-of-Service regulations for drivers operating with a limited radius of their terminal. FMCSA has considered excluding drivers from regulations if they do not drive more than a certain number of miles from a base location (i.e., within a 150-mile radius).

When you think about a “typical” workday, you probably want to compare a truck driver’s job to a standard job meaning roughly 8 hours a day Monday through Friday working in a single location with weekends and holidays off. For most jobs, the typical workday doesn’t really exist. And you can be sure that “working 9 to 5” is a schedule a truck driver never works. Every day is different. A driver runs into different challenges every day that cause hours to vary and distances driven to exceed or fall short of expectations. That’s why flexibility is an important trait of a truck driver. Yes, truck driving jobs do exist that allow drivers to be home every night, but OTR driving is seldom one of those jobs. As you explore different trucking schools, everyone will have a different perspective on trucking as a career. While it may not be for everyone, most truck drivers love what they do, and embrace the sense of community.

Back in 2018, the U.S. Department of Labor estimated the number of truck drivers needed would increase 5% by 2028. That’s almost 100,000 new jobs. As of September 2021, that number still increased. It’s now projected by the Bureau of Labor Statistics https://www.bls.gov/ooh/transportation-and-material-moving/delivery-truck-drivers-and-driver-sales-workers.htm that by 2030 it will continue to grow by 12% fast than the average of most professions. Keep in mind that these are “forecasted” numbers and assume few changes in supply-demand or major developments making truck drivers and OTR transportation necessary. These factors can change daily. Keep an eye on quarterly statistics is the best method of tracking job opportunities.

Upon finishing truck driving school, almost anyone can be a truck driver, provided they meet the physical and mental requirements to earn a CDL and safely operate a truck. In order to cross state lines a truck driver must be 21 years old however at 18 years old a student can get a CDL (varies by state) and can drive within the state. The best truck drivers have personal qualities helping them to make a career behind the wheel. If you are just beginning to consider truck driving as a profession — especially students — you probably want to know about training, experience, qualifications, and anything that may prohibit you from driving a truck. The following are a few requirements anyone wanting to drive a truck must consider: FMCSA and state requirements to obtain a CDL; Passing CDL written and skills tests; Passing a medical exam conducted by a FMCSA-approved physician with a focus on FMCSA guidelines for physical and mental health; Stick to any treatments or regiments prescribed by a medical examiner so you may pass periodic testing in the future; Abstain from using any illegal substances, even in your private life as many remain in your system for extended periods and may still impair driving long after they are used; Submit to and pass periodic illegal substance testing whether FMCSA-required or as required by an employer; Have a suitable driving record, especially when behind the wheel of a truck. These are just some basic requirements of any truck driver. They don’t vary by gender, age, region of the country, or demographics. Anyone who can follow the guidelines above can be a truck driver.

If you job shadow or interview a truck driver, ask questions! You’ll probably learn that while the basic requirement will qualify you as a driver, different carriers/companies have additional requirements of the drivers they hire. These are often included in job advertisements as well as in the KSAs for the job description. As you evaluate different truck driving schools, you’ll want to make sure that the curriculum covers a wide array of these requirements.

Any person operating a Commercial Motor Vehicle (CMV) in the United States (unless training) must have a valid Commercial Driver’s License (CDL). The type of CDL a driver needs depends on the type of Commercial Motor Vehicle being operated. The type of vehicle is normally defined as the combination of the truck and trailer. While the Federal Highway Administration developed standards for CDL licenses, the testing and issuing of CDLs is done at the state level. A truck drive may possess only one CDL from their “home” state.

CDLs are issued in one of three “Classes” — A, B, and C. The class of CLD license needed is dependent on the type of truck operated and the trailer and type of cargo. Class A CDLs are the most common versatile type of CDL drivers can carry. Class A CDLs allow drivers to operate almost any Class A, Class B, or Class C Commercial Motor Vehicle. Class A CDLs are required if a driver is operating, per the FMCSA as of September 2021, “any combination of vehicles with a GVWR/GVW (Gross Vehicle Weight Rating/Gross Vehicle Weight) of 26,001 or more pounds provided the GVWR/GVW of the vehicle(s) being towed is in excess of 10,000 pounds. Class A holders are also permitted to operate any commercial motor vehicle included in Classes B and C.” In simple terms, if you want to drive trucks often referred to as “18-wheelers,” you need a Class A CDL. Examples of trucks you can drive with a Class A CDL include: Tractor-trailers, Truck and trailer combinations, Tank vehicles, Livestock carriers, Flatbeds, Reefers and Logging vehicles.

A Class B CDL allows a driver to operate a vehicle with a “GVWR and GVW of 26,001 or more pounds, or any such vehicle towing a vehicle not in excess of 10,000 pounds GVWR and GVW. Class B holders are also permitted to operate any commercial motor vehicle included in Class C.” Examples of Commercial Motor Vehicles you can drive with a Class B CDL include: Buses, Tow trucks, Cement trucks, Dump trucks, other trucks used in the construction industry, Garbage and recycling trucks, Straight trucks, Box trucks, Armored vehicles, Package delivery vehicles, Utility vehicles. Class B CDL holders often drive “cash-in-transit vehicles,” defined as those with GVWRs between 8,000 and 12,000 pounds that securely transport freight in urban areas. With certain endorsements, a Class B CDL allows a driver to operate other vehicles as well.

A Class C CDL allows a driver to operate a single vehicle or combination of vehicles not meeting the definitions of Class A or Class B, but designed to transport 16 or more passengers (including the driver) or to transport material designated as hazardous but not carried in a vehicle requiring a Class A or Class B CDL. Examples of vehicles you can drive with a Class C CDL include: Small HazMat vehicles, Passenger vans or small buses, Vehicles requiring a CDL to operate but not covered in Class A or Class B definitions.

A CDL, or Commercial Driver’s License, is a type of motor vehicle operator’s license issued by a state after you have proven you hold the knowledge and ability to drive a Commercial Motor Vehicle of the appropriate classification. To obtain a CDL, you must pass a written test, a skills test, and obtain medical clearance.

A CLP, or Commercial Learner’s Permit, is a state-issued permit authorizing you to operate a Commercial Motor Vehicle for training purposes under the supervision of a valid CDL holder for the vehicle you are operating. Obtaining a CLP is often considered the first step taken toward earning a CDL. For anyone holding CLP, there are only three endorsements available as of September 2021 per the DOT and with restrictions: Passenger (P) - cannot carry passengers other than trainers or testers, School Bus (S) - cannot carry passengers other than trainers or testers, Tank Endorsement (T) - may only operate an empty tanker.